ACCEL: Evolving Curricula with Regret-Based Environment Design (Paper Review)

ACCEL: Evolving Curricula with Regret-Based Environment Design (Paper Review)

May 02, 2022
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#ai #accel #evolution Automatic curriculum generation is one of the most promising avenues for Reinforcement Learning today. Multiple approaches have been proposed, each with their own set of advantages and drawbacks. This paper presents ACCEL, which takes the next step into the direction of constructing curricula for multi-capable agents. ACCEL combines the adversarial adaptiveness of regret-based sampling methods with the capabilities of level-editing, usually found in Evolutionary Methods. OUTLINE: 0:00 - Intro & Demonstration 3:50 - Paper overview 5:20 - The ACCEL algorithm 15:25 - Looking at the pseudocode 23:10 - Approximating regret 33:45 - Experimental results 40:00 - Discussion & Comments Website: https://accelagent.github.io Paper: https://arxiv.org/abs/2203.01302 Abstract: It remains a significant challenge to train generally capable agents with reinforcement learning (RL). A promising avenue for improving the robustness of RL agents is through the use of curricula. One such class of methods frames environment design as a game between a student and a teacher, using regret-based objectives to produce environment instantiations (or levels) at the frontier of the student agent's capabilities. These methods benefit from their generality, with theoretical guarantees at equilibrium, yet they often struggle to find effective levels in challenging design spaces. By contrast, evolutionary approaches seek to incrementally alter environment complexity, resulting in potentially open-ended learning, but often rely on domain-specific heuristics and vast amounts of computational resources. In this paper we propose to harness the power of evolution in a principled, regret-based curriculum. Our approach, which we call Adversarially Compounding Complexity by Editing Levels (ACCEL), seeks to constantly produce levels at the frontier of an agent's capabilities, resulting in curricula that start simple but become increasingly complex. ACCEL maintains the theoretical benefits of prior regret-based methods, while providing significant empirical gains in a diverse set of environments. An interactive version of the paper is available at this http URL. Authors: Jack Parker-Holder, Minqi Jiang, Michael Dennis, Mikayel Samvelyan, Jakob Foerster, Edward Grefenstette, Tim RocktÀschel Links: TabNine Code Completion (Referral): http://bit.ly/tabnine-yannick YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/yannickilcher Twitter: https://twitter.com/ykilcher Discord: https://discord.gg/4H8xxDF BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/yannic-kilcher LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ykilcher BiliBili: https://space.bilibili.com/2017636191 If you want to support me, the best thing to do is to share out the content :) If you want to support me financially (completely optional and voluntary, but a lot of people have asked for this): SubscribeStar: https://www.subscribestar.com/yannickilcher Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/yannickilcher Bitcoin (BTC): bc1q49lsw3q325tr58ygf8sudx2dqfguclvngvy2cq Ethereum (ETH): 0x7ad3513E3B8f66799f507Aa7874b1B0eBC7F85e2 Litecoin (LTC): LQW2TRyKYetVC8WjFkhpPhtpbDM4Vw7r9m Monero (XMR): 4ACL8AGrEo5hAir8A9CeVrW8pEauWvnp1WnSDZxW7tziCDLhZAGsgzhRQABDnFy8yuM9fWJDviJPHKRjV4FWt19CJZN9D4n

0:00 - Intro & Demonstration 3:50 - Paper overview 5:20 - The ACCEL algorithm 15:25 - Looking at the pseudocode 23:10 - Approximating regret 33:45 - Experimental results 40:00 - Discussion & Comments
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